Fall 1998 E-Commerce Colloquia
¾ All are welcome! ¾

Friday, 9/25/98: Michel Benaroch, Syracuse University, “Electronic Commerce: Overview and Research Issues”

Friday, 10/2/98: Scott Webster, Syracuse University, “Introduction to the Mechanics of Digital Signatures and Encryption”

Friday, 10/30/98: Andy Covell, Syracuse University, “Internet Computing and Digital Convergence”

Friday, 11/13/98: Dr. Mani Agrawal, Operations Research Engineer, Manugistics, “Research Needs and Opportunities in Supply Chain Management”

Friday, 12/4/98: Dr. Pasumarti Kamesam, Manager, Emerging Technology Projects, T J Watson Research Center, Hawthorne, NY, “Data Mining Applications in Insurance”

Friday, 9/25/98, 2:00-3:30, room 101 in the School of Management: Michel Benaroch, Syracuse University, “Electronic Commerce: Overview and Research Issues”

Summary: Professor Benaroch will describe what electronic commerce is and give an overview of its scope.  There will be special emphasis on identifying research issues within EC.  The talk will be introductory in nature with no background in the area assumed.

Friday, 10/2/98, 3:00-4:30, room 101 in the School of Management: Scott Webster, Syracuse University, “Introduction to the Mechanics of Digital Signatures and Encryption”

Summary: Security is a major issue for companies contemplating the World Wide Web for business transactions.  The purpose of this talk is to provide a basic understanding of this issue.  The talk will be introductory in nature with no background on the subject matter assumed.  At the conclusion of the talk you will have an understanding of: (1) the differences between private and public key cryptosystems, (2) the mechanics of two methods, including a method that is becoming the standard for commerce, (3) the concept and mechanics of digital signatures.

Friday, 10/30/98, 3:00-4:30, room 003 School of Management: Andy Covell, Syracuse University, “Internet Computing and Digital Convergence”

Summary: The rapid evolution and convergence of digital communications technology, computing, and digital media is creating new capabilities that are changing the way businesses and individuals communicate, interact, collaborate, and share information.  This session will provide a brief overview of this phenomenon, then focus in on the underlying infrastructure technologies and emerging application technologies. The talk will conclude with a quick review of some of the critical technical and non-technical issues that are influencing the evolution of this infant phenomenon.

Friday, 11/13/98, 2:00-3:30, room 101 in the School of Management: Dr. Mani Agrawal, Operations Research Engineer, Manugistics, “Research Needs and Opportunities in Supply Chain Management”

Summary: Manugistics is a leader in developing and implementing software for managing supply chains.  This presentation will (1) review ways in which information technology is used to help manage supply chains and (2) identify issues in need of research.

Friday, 12/4/98, 3:00-4:30, room 003 in the School of Management: Dr. Pasumarti Kamesam, Manager, Emerging Technology Projects, T J Watson Research Center, Hawthorne, NY, “Data Mining Applications in Insurance”

Summary: This talk will describe two applications in Insurance that apply analytic models to very large databases to build business applications. Both these applications were built by working closely with large Insurance companies the United States and being implemented in other countries as well. A demonstration will follow a description of the problem and technology.

Customer Prospecting: Today it is possible to get access to very large demographic databases with information regarding millions of households.  Traditionally, market research techniques have been used to analyze customer databases and identify customer profiles. The Customer Prospecting system  (a joint project with one of IBM's Insurance Customers) is designed to apply analytic techniques against large demographic databases to generate prospect information for running marketing campaigns. When such a campaign is run by a large field force (such as agents), it is necessary to build an effective distribution system. In this project the Internet, the Web and Java are used to build a distribution system that carries the results of modeling to thousands of end users.

Underwriting Profitability Analysis: This application analyzes policy, demographic and claims history data to automatically identify underwriting rules. The underlying technology, however, is readily applicable to other applications as well.